DIY/Lo-Fi

I'm Here for the BOOs: Nashville's Halloween Playlist

Get tipsy off pumpkin beer? Check.
Watch Hocus Pocus and re-realize how awesome it is? Check.
Stress over the whole couples-costume thing? Check.
 

Create a totally badass Halloween playlist featuring some of my favorite local bands? CHECK.


Get in the spirit and give it a listen! -Caroline Bowman

 

   

October Tooth releases newest installment, "Three."

New endeavors get lost as time blurs all lines, but some artists maintain their ground. Nashville minimalist musician, October Tooth, has remained forbearing in releasing each new iteration of the concept once a year, in October.

In 2015, we get the third installment of the October Tooth project, aptly named “Three.” With the help of local engineers, Cowboy Sam and Trevor Richardson, the sonically reticent sounds of “Three” act as a seemingly bleak backdrop for a deceptively lush range of motifs – uncertainties of reality, change and the “hope that the ones I love are proud of me.” October Tooth acts as a catalog of each year for the artist; it just so happens this most recent year held a lot of things. -Sean McHugh

 

 

   

Bundles Release Two Tracks Off Upcoming Record

It's been a loooong time since I've been in a mosh pit, but Bundles' new tunes might change that for me in the not-so-distant future. The band recently released two blistering singles off of their upcoming (as-of-yet untitled) EP, and they're about as rowdy and raucous as anyone could hope for. "Dead Reckoning" has a great straight-forward main riff, with choruses that just make you want to chuck PBR and Narragansett cans on stage and shout at the top of your lungs. "Prisoner's Dilemma" delivers another powerful riff, this time with more rapid chord changes and a lead vocal that gives this song a slight Damn Personals feel.

Though the band have yet to set a release date for the material, you can catch them performing these songs live in a few weeks. October 23 they'll be at Cuisine en Locale/ONCE in Somerville, MA and November 25 (Thanksgiving eve!) in Quincy, MA at Quincy Sons of Italy.

For more info on the band, check out their Facebook page.

-Dan McMahon (@dmcmhn) 

   

Weyes Blood unveils video for "In the Beginning" from new "Cardamom Times" EP

Natalie Mering of Weyes Blood and her incredibly haunting voice are back with a new EP on Mexican Summer entitled "Cardamom Times." She recently unveiled this video for single "In the Beginning."

   

Album review: Bloodbirds - MMXIII

(Photo by Todd Zimmer)
 
Twenty-year veterans of the LFK/KC underground music scene, Mike and Brooke Tuley have played with a number of bands familiar to local rock audiences. Best known for their time with Ad Astra Per Aspera, they established Bloodbirds in 2011 with the intent of cutting loose and shaking things up.
 
And they have. Dense, dark—equal parts Fun House (Stooges), Spacemen 3 and Black Angels—Bloodbirds’ newest release MMXIII may also be their swan song, given the departure of bassist Anna St. Louis for Chicago. In some ways, it is St. Louis whose playing defines the band. Forward in the mix, and by no means shy, St. Louis plays with punchy authority, reminding of some of the other great “lead” bass players like Jon Entwistle and Peter Hook. Brooke Tuley is a powerful drummer; her parts are simple, but dead-on. She locks perfectly with St. Louis.  Mike Tuley plays on top of their aggressive foundation, a canvas for his arsenal of shimmering hammer-ons (“Modern Sympathy”), punishing riffs (“Did You Say”), and sometime dulcet tones (the comparatively clean Blue Mask jangle of “Convalesce”). Depending on the song, his sound can be metal harrowing or as ropey, surf-psychedelic as the theme from Repo Man.
 
About those songs: they’re functional, gripping, emotional soundscapes, not necessarily bound by pop hook conventions. They hit you with the shape-shift intensity of vintage heavy rock like Blue Cheer or modern darkness merchants like Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. Which is to say the focus here is not necessarily on hum-ability. Even allowing for that, it would be nice if the vocals had a dash less delay density and a bit more clarity in the mix. Lyrics and vocals on MMXIII are more about mood than meaning (or mood as meaning), stray lyrics emerging from the driving murk to arrest your conscious mind here and again.
 
The tough thump of “No Trains Coming Through” totally belies the song’s title. With Roky’s manic intensity, the song “Did You Say” features the ominous, repeated line “Did you say you want the end to come right now?” And the music echoes the sentiment. “Round Moon’s” cascade of guitar features some of Tuley’s most expressive fretwork, summoning up the incantations of bands like the Icarus Line and the guitar howl of the Stooges’ Ron Asheton. For an album that emphasizes a certain heavy-osity, MMXIII manages to shift mood and tone effectively.
 
Brothers and sisters, the Bloodbirds can make a show-stopping addition to anybody’s Psych Fest. Live shows may be few and far between, given the departure of St. Louis, but they have reunited in support of MMXIII occasionally and the members remain close friends and open to the odd gig. Go catch them if you have the chance.
 
—Steve Wilson