Electronic

Bay Babes: Tricycle Records Releases Compilation Vol. 9

Our friends at Tricycle Records released their 9th compilation album this month featuring a whole lotta women that we dig on. There’s Kendra McKinley, whose “Asleep in Winter” showcases her connective and empathetic lyrics in funky pop with looping pedal work (Performed by Kendra McKinley, recorded and mixed by Scott McDowell at the Henry Miller Memorial Library).

We dig on Micropixie’s “Dark Sight of the Moon,” with its Pink Floyd inspirations and the powerful push against modern day politics on the home front and beyond. It’s electro psych pop dripping with social justice narratives. If you haven't caught it yet, check out her video for "Como Minimo," shot at our beloved Lovejoy's Tea Room in San Francisco. 

Another favorite is Beckylin and Her Druthers with “You Ain’t Woman Enough”…to take my man. Damn straight. A nice and exciting find for any country fans. Beckylin and Her Druthers are bluegrass and twangin’ and powerfully sassy. -Michelle Kicherer, Associate Editor

   

Copyslut's latest video "Maker's Mark"

Oakland-based queer band Copyslut released their video for "Maker's Mark" this fall. The song is about "...inherited trauma, sparking its inspiration from one of the most famous oral legends in Mexican folklore: 'La Llorona.' Filled with healing pleasure and queer artistic celebration, the music video takes its audience from the streets of the trans district in San Francisco into a world and culture they push to make possible..." The sexified cabaret video is dark and captivating accompaniment to the song and we will leave it up to your viewing pleasure. -Lucille Faulkner

   

NightFire Releases Haunting Single with "Spell On You"

Ambient synths, haunting vocals and an undercurrent of deep house all coalesce in NightFire’s rendition of “(I Put A) Spell On You”. Released right before Halloween, “Spell On You” is a seductive soundscape with entrancing vocals that deftly masks a brooding menace that builds steadily throughout the track. NightFire is the burgeoning bedroom pop project of Houston-based chanteuse, Rebecca Chirich, who began making music in 2014 but only recently began releasing her music. “Spell On You” is the first of a handful of singles that will begin to drop over the next few months, potentially culminating with a NightFire debut album in 2020. Understated and seemingly nonchalant, Chirich has succeeded in creating an alluring aesthetic with NightFire. Her intimate lyrics and pulsing beats are addictive as they are enjoyable.. Keep an eye out for NightFire live shows coming in 2020.

-Lee Ackerley

“Spell On You” is available on Spotify/Google/Apple/Amazon

   

A Deli Premiere: "Pretty People" by World Federal Organization Club

It’s a happy Saturday, New England: revel in the luscious synth-rock of Boston’s World Federal Organization Club. The band’s latest single, “Pretty People,” is a time-traveling composition that will dazzle you with groovy ‘70s disco basslines, sharp ‘80s synth stabs, and ‘00s indie-rock electric guitar flourishes. The vocals, with a hint of Modest Mouse wildness, lead the way toward a liberating-atmospheric breakdown, a finale that drops you into the present with modern electro flair. The upbeat track flaunts its undeniable sonic colors, charming and luring you to let loose and dance away; a single play of the song just won’t do. “Pretty People” is a preview of the band’s upcoming debut record, currently in its final stages, according to the Tufts University students that fashion the group. With shows on the horizon this winter, we are thrilled to keep an eye on World Federal Organization Club; premiering their brand new single is only the start. - Rene Cobar, Photo by Gabriella Melchiorri

   

Thievery Corporation Thaws Austin with Spiritualized Vibes

  Frigid temperatures seeped through the inadequate winter wear of Austinites gathered at Stubbs on Wednesday night. With indoor concerts like Two Door Cinema Club, the Black Keys and Modest Mouse all happening around town on the same night; it wouldn't be illogical to think that music fans might opt for a cozy, comfortable venue in which they could enjoy their beer and music without harsh artic winds blowing around them. Yet the tandem of New York-based party outfit, Brazilian Girls, and the Austin-affiliated eclectic electronica group, Thievery Corporation, would bring a dedicated crowd that mitigated the November frost by manifesting a soulful dance party.

Brazilian Girls' original lead singer, Sabina Sciubba, declined to come on tour; yet her presence was hardly missed since her replacement, Sophia Urista, injected a youthful vigor and smoldering sexuality into the band's dynamic. Gyrating and erupting through the band's staccato hit "Pirates", it became clear that Sophia had no qualms making these songs her own. As the crowd continued to trickle in, Brazilian Girls began to hit the zenith of their set with elongated jams to hits like "Don't Stop" and "Pussy". The festive and tropical stylings of Brazilian Girls served as a perfect preface to the spiritual zionist vibes of Thievery Corporation that would follow.

It has to be a powerful force that can pull Austinites out of their central-heated homes and into freezing temperatures, but Thievery Corporation transcends being 'just another' touring band - they're an immersive experience. While the foundational duo of Thievery was incomplete (Rob Garza was present but not Eric Hilton), the constant stream of featured artists kept the audience fixated on what felt like a variety show stage of incredible talent. A melange of exotic musical influences weave through the band's sound, all tethered together with a streak of elevated consciousness. A bedouin-influenced opener of "Facing East" soon flowed into the latin-styled "Sol Tapado" which then warped into the politically conscious hip-hop track "Culture of Fear". A parade of featured artists emerged on nearly every track: Mr. Lif, LouLou, Puma and the indomitable Raquel Jones. 

The epoch of the show would arrive with the Thievery's mega-hit "Lebanese Blonde", followed by the francophile-disco track "Voyage Libre", which was bookended by the heart-wrenching "Sweet Tides". An intimate acoustic interlude was unexpected but allowed a degree of gravity and introspection that cleansed the palate for the last few songs."Ghettomatrix" and "Richest Man In Babylon" would close out a night of spiritual ebullience. In a time when extremes seem to polarize, strain and distance us - Thievery Corporation brought an atmosphere of benevolence and self-love that warmed every soul bearing the wintry winds of our time.

- Lee Ackerley