Folk/Country

Ewe Dew's dynamic nature reigns on "Suspine Butterfly"

A rawness permeates the entirety of Supsine Butterfly, the debut full length by Brooklyn trio Ewe Dew. It’s a product of the band’s instrumentation, which veers from traditional folk punk into mathy, off-kilter acoustic segues on a dime, as well as the raw lyricism of frontman Christian Brion. Standout track “Wild Oats” is a pertinent example of Ewe Dew’s strengths, beginning with an antique metaphor of youth before transition to an impassioned, stream of consciousness narrative, highlighted by track’s shifting time signature and modulation between electric and acoustic textures. These dynamic changes make for engaging listening on Suspine Butterfly, and promises even more experimentation on Ewe Dew’s forthcoming second LP Birds Alight, dropping later this spring. Until then, stream them below. -Connor Beckett McInerney (@b_ck_tt)

   

King Calaway releases music video for "World For Two"

While King Calaway have clout in the mainstream music scene -- with solo careers, American Idol appearances, and international performances under each of the members' belts -- their debut self-titled album established them as one of Nashville's newest bands on the rise. The band's first single "World For Two" has a sound that layers the soul of Ed Sheeran with the harmony and richness of Little Big Town, a sound that permeates every word and note that comes out of the band's music. The six-member King Calaway has members from both sides of the Atlantic, so while on a surface listen their songs might sound like pure Americana, there is a universal appeal to them that will delight fans of all good music around the globe. Take a look at the music video for "World For Two" below. - Will Sisskind

   

Folk/Country

Time: 
20:00
Band name: 
Amilia K Spicer
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/amiliakspicermusic/
Venue name: 
McCabe’s Guitar Shop
   

Songwriter Nicole Jackson releases EP "Radio Silence"

You might pass a hundred singer-songwriters in the Music City every day, whether they're lawyers, cashiers, or even your best friend who has a secret diary which you don't know about. Often times, they're university students, as is the case with Nicole Jackson. The Portland-born singer-songwriter studies the music business at Belmont University, but she's also put out a collection of four tracks called Radio Silence. The EP showcases a talent with songwriting on par with indie up-and-comers like Snail Mail and big names like Kacey Musgraves and Carrie Underwood. Tracks on Radio Silence range in intensity from barnstormer "Disappear" to post-punk tinged "Ghosts" to the ballad title track. It's a promising debut from one of the many aspiring musicians who walk among us. Take a listen to Radio Silence below. - Will Sisskind

   

Looms' "Eclipse" is an ode to emotional paralysis - live at Berlin 3.28

It’s hard not bask in the languid world of “Eclipse,” the first single off dream punk act Looms’ new record The Way Up. Written after a summer tour and a break up, frontman Sharif Mekawy’s lyrics about “wishing the moon would make it dark” embody a passive paralysis, the feeling of watching the hours tick by, a stupor from the reception of unexpected and unpleasant news. Looms’ interweaving guitars bolster this vibe, its impressive sundrenched noodling a sonic representation of the frustration that lies just below the surface. And while the Brooklyn four piece may have chosen to name this track after a solar eclipse, it feels just like a lazy afternoon in how it encapsulates the boring-to-death moments in between the events that define our lives. Give it a listen below, and catch Looms at Berlin on March 28th alongside Color Tongue, Monoculture, and Huh. -Connor Beckett McInerney (@b_ck_tt), Photo by Liz Maney